Ondol clinic, Japanese acupuncture, remedial massage, stress management, Toowong, Brisbane

​​Dietetics

Food is medicine

​​​ Ondol Clinic Location: 129 Sylvan Road, Toowong, Q 4066 | Phone: (07) 3371 0100 | Website: www.ondol.com.au | Ondol Oriental Medicine Clinic © 2015 | Designed by Roz Stokes Design

Dietetics 

Oriental medicine has always put greatest emphasis on digestive health being pivotal to the functioning of all other organ systems. In recent years Western research seems to be coming to the same conclusion with more and more focus on the importance of gut health and immunity. 

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 Ondol Clinic Location: 129 Sylvan Road, Toowong, Q 4066 | Phone: (07) 3371 0100 | Website: www.ondol.com.au | Ondol Oriental Medicine Clinic © 2015 | Designed by Roz Stokes Design

​​Ondol Oriental Medicine Clinic (07) 3371 0100

Dietary suggestions are based on different ways of looking at food.

The diet guidelines that we recommend have an emphasis on whole foods, taking the Western knowledge of modern nutrition, vitamins and minerals into account and incorporating it into the holistic system of Oriental medicine.

The Eastern tradition focuses on the energetics of warming and cooling properties in food. Cooking methods that involve more cooking time, higher temperatures, greater pressure, dryness and /or air circulation ( such as convection –oven cooking) impart more warming qualities to food. Raw food and food eaten cold are more cooling than cooked food.
Foods with blue, green or purple colours are usually more cooling than similar foods that are red, orange or yellow (a green apple is more cooling than a red apple). In Oriental medicine warm food is generally given preference to cold food to help the digestive process in breaking down nutrients and waste (transportation and transformation of food). One way to facilitate greater assimilation and warmth is to chew food more thoroughly.  

Life is described in five elements: Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal and Water. 
Each element has a corresponding flavour: sour, bitter, sweet, pungent and salty. Balancing the elements by eating from the different flavour groups is an important component of Eastern medicine.